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Open Peer Review for the Humanities

Edward Vallance, “The 1723 oath rolls in England: an electronic finding list”

The 1723 oath rolls in England: an electronic finding list
Edward Vallance, University of Roehampton
Generously supported by the Marc Fitch Fund

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Acknowledgments

Permalink for this paragraph 0 This project has been generously supported by an award from the Marc Fitch Fund. Earlier work on the Norfolk, Sussex, Worcestershire and York returns was supported by the award of a British Academy Small Research Grant.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 I am particularly grateful to Dr Simon Dixon, now of the University of Leicester, for his suggestion that a finding list of these returns could be valuable. It was Simon’s pioneering work on the Devon returns, in conjunction with the Friends of Devon Archives, which first fully opened up the potential of these records for historians. Simon and Pete Seaman kindly looked over an early draft of the list. Any remaining errors are, of course, the fault of the compiler.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 I would also like to thank the many local archivists and family and local historians who have helped with this project. I have acknowledged their assistance in the finding list itself.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 This version created 2nd July 2013

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Introduction

Permalink for this paragraph 0 The oaths of allegiance to George I, tendered to the nation in the autumn and winter of 1723, represent the last exercise in mass public oath-taking and individual county returns can feature thousands of names (the largest so far identified – the Devon returns – feature some 25000). However, unlike similar documents such as the Protestation of 1641 (in the House of Lords Record Office) or the Association of 1696 (in the National Archives), the returns for this oath were not collected centrally. Instead, oath rolls are most often found in quarter sessions records as the oaths were subscribed at special Midsummer and Michaelmas sessions in 1723.[1]

Permalink for this paragraph 0 These name-rich documents are of obvious value to family historians but they have some distinctive features which set them apart from other similar oath returns. First, about 3 in 10 of those subscribing the Devon returns were women and high numbers of female subscribers have also been noted in other county returns that have so far been examined (Norfolk and Worcestershire). Second, some returns also include details of occupation and social status (for men), and marital status (for women).[2]

Permalink for this paragraph 0 The oaths of 1723 were connected to the dynastic outcome of the Revolution of 1688 which had seen the Catholic James II replaced by his Protestant daughter Mary and her husband William of Orange. Initially, in order to accommodate those who had conscientious objections to the manner in which this dynastic change had been effected, the new oaths of allegiance to William and Mary effectively required that swearers recognise them only as de facto monarchs: “I A B doe sincerely Promise and Sweare That I will be Faithfull and beare true Allegiance to Their Majestyes King William and Queene Mary Soe helpe me God &c.”

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Even this modest promise proved too much for some: 400 Anglican clergymen, the so-called non-jurors, refused the oaths leading to a schism within the Church of England.  The loyalties of significant sections of both the church and the Tory party remained suspect and with the supporters of the exiled Catholic Stuart dynasty, the Jacobites, continuing to contest the outcome of the revolution by force of arms in Ireland, Scotland and at sea, there were repeated attempts in Parliament to produce a more stringent test of loyalty.[3]

Permalink for this paragraph 0 That was finally secured in 1696 in the wake of the discovery of a Jacobite assassination plot in which a deadly assault on the king’s coach on his return from hunting at Richmond would be followed by English risings, a French invasion and the restoration of James II. The uncovering of the plot was a coup for William’s government which, at the time, was mired in a deep financial crisis. The threat to national security persuaded Parliament to agree to a new sworn ‘association’ which would bind those taking it to defend William against further attempts on his life. The association was consciously modelled on the Elizabethan ‘Bond of Association’ of 1584 which had been formed after the Catholic Throckmorton Plot to kill Elizabeth and replaced her with Mary Queen of Scots.[4]

Permalink for this paragraph 0 However, the 1696 association, which required those taking it to acknowledge William as ‘rightful and lawful King’, represented a far more significant undertaking than its Elizabethan predecessor. Whereas the 1689 oaths to William and Mary had only been tendered to officeholders, the association was imposed on the public at large, not only in Britain but in its colonies as well. The London Gazette reported that in Suffolk some 70,000 people had taken the association – to put this in perspective, the population of the entire county has been estimated at around 125000 in the 1670s. In Middlesex, the press reported, five hundred skins of parchment had been prepared with the text of the Association at the top to be sent out to petty constables so that the oath could be tendered to ‘every House-keeper and Lodger’ (Post Man and the Historical Account, 17-19 March, issue 134). In all, the National Archives at Kew holds nearly five hundred separate rolls for the Solemn Association of 1696.[5]

Permalink for this paragraph 0 The 1723 oaths do not appear to have matched the 1696 association in scale and scope but they were prompted by similar concerns and also represented a significant administrative undertaking. Jacobitism represented a significant threat to the Hanoverian regime. There was widespread anti-Hanoverian rioting at the accession of George I and, in 1715, a major armed rebellion. In 1722, a major Jacobite conspiracy was uncovered, the so-called Atterbury plot (named after Francis Atterbury, bishop of Rochester, one of the plotters). Once again, conspiracy provided the justification for testing the nation’s loyalties and while the individual rolls for these oaths don’t seem to have been of the size of those of 1696, they demonstrated a greater interest in securing the loyalty of women and occasionally provided much greater information about the subscribers themselves.[6]

Permalink for this paragraph 0 It is not completely clear why the practice of tendering oaths to the English public en masse was abandoned after 1723. Certainly, some contemporary commentators viewed the enterprise as an exercise in futility and it was a commonplace that oaths of loyalty only caught the scrupulous, not the politically suspect. However, observations of this kind had been made for over a hundred years. Perhaps a better explanation lies in the growth of voluntary political associations in the eighteenth-century which lessened the need for direct state intervention and which also created a better impression of public support for the British state.[7]

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Permalink for this paragraph 0 The oaths

Permalink for this paragraph 0 1723 Oath Act required that all persons failing to take the oaths of allegiance, supremacy and abjuration by 25 December 1723 had to register their names and real estates in court. Failure to comply with this deadline would result in the forfeiture of their estates. The Oath Act was combined with the Catholic Taxation Act which looked to raise some £100,000 from a levy imposed on all Catholics aged 18 and over.  An explanatory text accompanying published texts of the Oath Act made clear that the women as well as men over the age of 18 were to take the oaths if they had not done so before. One implication here was women property-holders would, like men, need to register their estates if they would not swear the oaths. However, as the returns already examined clearly indicate, many married women took the oaths who would not have owned property in their own right. A subsequent act, passed in March 1724 explained that women did not need to take the oaths or register their property. By this point, however, mass public subscription to these oaths, including by large numbers of women, had already taken place. Given the consistency with which large numbers of women subscribers appear on the roles, administrative confusion alone seems to be an inadequate explanation. It seems more likely, as suggested by Simon Dixon, that surveying the loyalty of women have been deemed necessary given the prominence of women in anti-Hanoverian rioting. Some of the ways in which family groups and even office-holders and their wives swore together suggest that re-affirming the traditional patriarchal order (ironically through action requiring feminine political participation) was one aim of these oaths.[8]

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Administration

Permalink for this paragraph 0 The oaths were administered at special Midsummer and Michaelmas Quarter Sessions, often held in inns in market towns or larger parishes –consequently taking the oaths involved sometimes considerable travel for those subscribing. The method of administration therefore poses a further problem for those wishing to use the returns for genealogical research as, unlike the Protestation or Association rolls, oaths were not necessarily tendered in the subscribers’ parish or hundred of residence. Once they had arrived at the place of subscription, it is unlikely given that hundreds often subscribed on the same day, that individuals would have read out the whole oath (or had read out to them) before subscribing. To add to the general inconvenience of taking these oaths, the legislation also required a small fee (three pence) to be paid upon making your subscription.[9]

Permalink for this paragraph 0 The text of the three oaths required under the legislation is reproduced here:

Permalink for this paragraph 0 http://www.foda.org.uk/oaths/intro/appendix2.htm (accessed 27 June 2013)

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Rationale, method and approach

Permalink for this paragraph 0 The aim of this project has been to attempt to identify all the surviving returns of the 1723 oaths in England. I have not attempted to identify any returns which may survive for any other parts of the British Isles or its colonies, though I would welcome any information concerning such returns.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Local record offices in England were contacted via e-mail and requested to provide information concerning any possible returns. The key information that was requested, and is supplied in this list, was a document reference and any other available details concerning the nature of the oath roll (size, date, presence of women subscribers and other information – occupation/status).

Permalink for this paragraph 0 In some instance, this initial approach supplied all the key information. Where archive catalogues do not have a fuller description, document searches were paid for in order to supply these details. In a number of cases I have visited the archive myself to examine the rolls. In some cases, these research enquiries are still ongoing and the list will be supplemented in due course when they are complete.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 In the case of a number of English counties, an initial search indicates that no returns survive. This is not surprising given that English quarter sessions records, where these rolls are usually located, are often incomplete. However, the survival of certificates testifying that individuals had taken oaths in counties where no rolls are extant does suggest nationwide administration.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 It is hoped that through mounting a version of this finding list on the web, local researchers with their own knowledge of the archives may be able to fill in the gaps. As the finding list indicates, a number of rolls have already been transcribed by local and family historians and there may be others out there. Perhaps this list may also encourage others to transcribe some of the rolls identified here. As with the information already supplied, any further knowledge contributed about these rolls will be gratefully acknowledged.

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Further reading

Permalink for this paragraph 0 The main resource for understanding these documents is the Devon Oath Rolls Project:

Permalink for this paragraph 0 http://www.foda.org.uk/oaths/intro/introduction1.htm (accessed 27 June 2013)

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Apart from this website there are also some helpful references to the oaths in the following books:

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Mark Knights, Representation and Misrepresentation in Later Stuart Britain: Partisanship and Political Culture (Oxford, 2005), pp. 159-60

Permalink for this paragraph 0 P. Langford, Public Life and the Propertied Englishman (Oxford, 1991), pp. 104-5.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Hannah Smith, Georgian Monarchy Politics and Culture, 1714-1760 (Cambridge, 2006)

Permalink for this paragraph 0 E. P. Thompson, Whigs and Hunters: The Origin of the Black Act (New York, 1975), pp. 199-200

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Those interested in researching how this legislation affected English Catholics should consult

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Bro Rory, FSC, ‘A Project to Index Pre 1837 Catholics’, Catholic Ancestor, 11, (2007), pp. 299-310

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List of Returns by County

Berkshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 No returns identified – information from Lisa Spurrier, Archivist, Berkshire Record Office

Bedfordshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 No returns identified – information from Kathryn Faulkner, Archivist, Bedfordshire and Luton Archives and Records Service

Buckinghamshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Centre for Buckinghamshire Studies

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference:  Q/RRo/10; Q/RRo/11

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: c. 8000 names, Q/RRo/11 includes Quaker affirmations

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional info: Published as Buckinghamshire Sessions Records Volume VI, ed. W. Le Hardy (1953). The list for Sherington is available online: http://www.mkheritage.co.uk/shhs/oath.htm (accessed 27th June 2013)

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Access to Archives & Chris Low, Archivist, Centre for Buckinghamshire Studies

Cambridgeshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Cambridgeshire Archives

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference:  Q/S3/1.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: Volume covers 1715-1731/2. Folios 25-154 consist of people taking oaths in 1723 at various sessions. On a full page about 35 names are listed.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Sally-Ann Greensmith, Archives Assistant, Cambridgeshire Archives

Cheshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Cheshire Archives and Local Studies

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: QDR3

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: 353 pages, c. 10500 names, approx one fifth women, written in one clear hand, so presumably a scribal ‘fair copy’. The return gives subscribers’ place of abode, as well as social/marital status (for women subscribers) and occupation. In this respect, the Cheshire return is the most detailed of all those examined so far.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional info: Transcription of QDR3 made by Bertram Merrell. A copy of this, re-organized alphabetically by subscriber surname, is held at Cheshire Record Office (Central 2463). QDR4 contains presentments of papists in 1723 (also indexed by Merrell in Central 2463) and there is a certificate of John Lach of Kinnerton taking the oaths in Nov 1723 (DDX416.22).

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Caroline Picco, Archivist, Cheshire Archives and Local Studies and Access to Archives. A photocopy of QDR3 and scans of Central 2463 were examined by Edward Vallance.

Cornwall

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository:  Cornwall Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: No significant returns but reference to a John and Aurelia Rogers taking the oaths Dec 1723 at Penryn, RP/1/79-80

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Jennie Hancock, Archivist, Cornwall Record Office

Cumbria

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Cumberland

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Cumbria Archive Centre, Carlisle

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: QRR 5/3

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: c. 9000 names, simply dated 1723

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Tom Robson, Senior Archivist, Cumbria Archive Centre

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Westmoreland

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Cumbria Archive Centre, Kendal

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: WQ/J/2

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: 12 membranes, the last blank, dated from 7th Oct 1723 to Nov 1723. Place of subscription listed – ‘Appleby’, ‘Kirkby Kendall’, p. 11 declarations of Quakers. C. 4500 signatures and marks. Some women subscribers, (roughly 10-15% of signatures).

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Kate Holliday, Searchroom Supervisor, Cumbria Archives Centre, Kendal. Digitization undertaken by Francesca Halfacree, Cumbria Archive Centre, Carlisle

Derbyshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 No records – information from Karen Millhouse, Duty Archivist

Devon

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Devon county

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Devon Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference:  Full document index at http://www.foda.org.uk/oaths/index/documents.htm

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: 59 separate oaths rolls featuring c. 25,000 names. Full description at

Permalink for this paragraph 0 http://www.foda.org.uk/oaths/intro/introduction12.htm

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Simon Dixon and Friends of Devon Archives.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional info: Full details and transcriptions of Devon oaths can be found on Devon oath rolls website: http://www.foda.org.uk/oaths/intro/introduction1.htm. Access to Archives – note concerning the taking of the oaths of allegiance, 1723, Salcombe Regis baptisms, marriages and burials, 3232A/PR1.

Exeter

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Devon Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: See document index link above

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: Two rolls, 1st c. 228 names, 2nd, c. 1367

Dorset

Permalink for this paragraph 0 No returns identified. Although Dorset History Centre holds two volumes of 18th century oath books (Q/Oaths/1a and 1b) covering the period within its records these do not contain the large rolls dedicated to recording public subscription to these tests. Information on the oath books courtesy of Dr Mark Forrest, Dorset History Centre. Digital images of the books were examined by Edward Vallance.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional info: Possible returns at D/RWR/X25 1723 oath roll Wareham Borough; Poole Borough, DC/PL/B/10/1/9 -14 1723. Source, Access to archives.

Durham

Permalink for this paragraph 0 No surviving county returns – info Liz Bragazzi, County Archivist, Durham Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional info:  There are some references to the oaths in Durham Diocesan Records, now kept in Durham University Library -

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Greenslade Deeds: Co.Durham/Barnard Castle/109-110 = writs relating to taking oaths of William Hutchinson of Barnard Castle, July 1722 and August 1723 (listed at http://reed.dur.ac.uk/xtf/view?docId=ead/ded/grnslade.xml#GRN-BC-109)

Permalink for this paragraph 0 BAK 8/55 (Baker Baker papers) = certificate that John Conyers Esq, of Layton has taken oaths, September 1723 (http://reed.dur.ac.uk/xtf/view?docId=ead/fam/baker.xml#BAK-8-55)

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Andrew Gray, Assistant Keeper, Durham University Library

Essex

Essex County

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Essex Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: Q/RRo1/6; Q/RRo1/7

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description:
Q/RRo 1/6 Oaths of Allegiance, Abjuration and Supremacy subscribed by persons over 18
September 1723
1 roll (11 membranes)
Subscribed at Quarter Sessions and adjournments in various towns.
Nearly 6000 signatures or marks, but half now illegible.
Neither abode nor description is given, but as the majority took the oaths locally many persons can be identified. Perhaps one-fifth are women.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Membrane Place of adjournment
1a (column 1) White Horse in ?Rayleigh
1b (column 3) Illegible. ? South Essex [judging by names]
2b (column 1) Illegible Justices include Francis Gardiner who lived at Tollesbury. ? Maldon
3a (column 3) Illegible. Justice’s name Creffield. ? Colchester district
3b (column 3) ?
4a (column 4) South-west Essex ? Ongar or Epping [Judging by names on 4b]
5a (column 3) Crown Inn, Epping
6a (column 1) Rose and Crown, [Saffron] Walden
6b (column 2) Royal Oak, Great Dunmow
7a (column 1) House of Henry Stane, Great Dunmow [very short list]
7a (column 2) Royal Oak in Great Dunmow [short list]
7a (column 3) Royal Oak, Great Dunmow
8a (column 4) illegible
9 ? North-west Essex [judging by names]
10a (column 3) George in Halstead
11 ? South Essex, Romford district [judging by names]
This covered one roll of 11 membranes.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Q/RRo 1/7: Oaths of Allegiance, Abjuration and Supremacy subscribed by persons over 18
August 1723
1 roll (3 membranes)
Supplementary roll signed at Quarter Sessions adjournments at
m.1a (column 1) Angel, Great Ilford (19 August)
m.1b (column 1) Crown, Brentwood (22 August)
m.2a (column 3) Cock and Bell, Chelmsford (26, 27 August.)

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional info: Note that F. G. Emmison and R. E. Negus, Guide the Quarter Sessions and Other Official Records (Essex Archaeological Society, Colchester, 1946) give different numbers for the above roll, identifying c. 8000 names, of which 3000 were now largely illegible and suggests that around one fifth are women, see pp. 42-6.
Borough of Colchester

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: D/B 5 Sr134

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: 7 October 1723 1 roll
This roll, described as ‘Sessions Roll Midsummer 1723′ on the British Museum vellum wrapper, has been reassigned to the Michaelmas session of that year
Item 18 (oath roll endorsed ’22 April 1723′) relates to Easter Session, items 1 and 19 (latter an oath roll) to Midsummer, but all others to Michaelmas, 1723

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Permalink for this paragraph 0 Borough of Maldon

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: D/B 3/3/173

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: contains an oath roll for December 1723

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source for all references: Seax and ERO archivist (no name supplied!)

Gloucestershire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 No significant returns – information Sarah Aitken, Archives Assistant, Gloucestershire Archives

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional information – A number of certificates of individuals taking the oaths of allegiance in 1723 are recorded in the catalogue (see below)

JF9.361GS These are to certify whom it may concern that at the general Quarter Sessions of the peace, held in and for the county of Gloucester, before Sir Richard Cocks, … William Purnell of Dursley … did in open court take the oaths of allegiance, supremacy and abjuration …, dated this 6th of Novmeber 1723 1723
D1086/T60 2 tenements, formerly one messuage, garden and orchard (1a.), Collins’ Ground (8a., abuttals), all at Nind Includes copy wills of John Wilkins of Nind, yeom., (1698), and Dan. Collins of Kingswood, yeom. (1725, pr. 1727); and certificate of Oath of Allegiance of Dan. Collins, 1723Original bundle 1666-1770
D1086/F77 Miscellaneous papers Includes certificate of oath of allegiance, 1723, admission to chambers at Lincolns Inn with bills for dinners, duties and chamber, 1727, and solicitor’s account, 1733-35 1723-1735
D2462/17 Papers re Charfield including glebe terrier, 1721; 2 certificates for taking oath of allegiance, 1723; bills for repairing bells, 1779; agreement for prosecution of felons, 1781; detailed bills and accounts for building a new poor house, 1784-5 18th cent
D3365/13 Cottage called Badham, close called Old Sodbury Mead, close called Corland and land (15a) Includes oath of allegiance of Eliz. Tanner, 1723; quitclaim, 1417 (no details)(Adey) 1714-1723
D9125/1/11118 Certificate of the oath of allegiance taken by Elizabeth Clarke, of Tewkesbury, at the Tewkesbury quarter sessions held 13 December 1723 1723

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Hampshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Hampshire county

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Hampshire Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: Q25/1/5

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: Length of roll 70 feet or 21.33 metres. C 7,000 names on the whole roll.  Includes women’s names/signatures.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Includes signatures taken at adjournments held at the Chequer Inn, Winchester; the house of John Foyle, Winchester; The Kings Head, Hursley; The Red Lion, Fareham; The Rising Sun, Gosport; The Crown, Bishops Waltham; the Bugle Inn, Titchfield; The White Hart, Whitchurch; the house of the Hon George Brydges, Avington; the George Inn, New Alresford; The Maidenhead, Basingstoke; The Blue Anchor, Redbridge, being the house of Ralph Street; The White Hart, Ringwood, being the house of William Bound (?); the White Swan, Fordingbridge, being the house of Edward Dowding; the Dolphin Inn, Christchurch, being the house of Peter Dove; The Nags Head, Lymington; the George Inn, Winchester; the White Hart Inn, Petersfield; Stockbridge; the house of the Hon John Merrill, Lainston; The White Hart, Alton; The White Swan, Kingsclere; the George Inn, Newport (Isle of Wight); the house of Hannah Dillington, Knighton [Niton], (Isle of Wight); The White Hart, East Cowes (Isle of Wight); The Red Lion, Gosport.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Carol Linton, Archives and Local Studies Assistant, Hampshire Archives and Local Studies. Oath roll examined by Gina Turner, Archives and Studies Assistant.

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Permalink for this paragraph 0 Borough of Romsey return

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Hampshire Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: 97M81/III/3

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: 192 names total of which c. 100 female

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional information: Transcription of the roll has been made by Barbara Burbridge and Pat Genge of the Lower Test Valley Archaeological Study Group (LTVAS). I am grateful to Pat Genge for sending me a copy of the transcription. An early 19th century transcription of the roll was also made by the ornithologist and archaeologist Dr. John Latham and forms part of volume 6 of his ‘Collections for a History of Romsey’, British Library Add MS 26774-26780.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Pat Genge/Access to Archives

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Permalink for this paragraph 0 Borough of Southampton

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Southampton Archives Service

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: SC 9/1/124a

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: roll around 267cm long, dating 17th October to 24th December 1723. Estimated 487 names (about 189 women and 298 men)

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Joanne Smith, Archivist, Arts & Heritage, Southampton City Council.

Herefordshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Herefordshire Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: Q/RO/2

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description:  Covers sessions taking place on 7 September 1723 and 3 December 1723. It is very difficult to quantify the size of the roll; it’s tightly rolled and c.15cm in diameter. The roll is easily over 10 meters in length and contains thousands of names.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Philip Bouchier, Archivist, Herefordshire Record Office

Hertfordshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: QS MISC 1150

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: C. 6050 signatures/marks. 20 large sheets of parchment sewn together at the top and rolled up. There are signatures on either side of the pages; some are faded and some of the pages are damaged.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: S Williams, Hertfordshire Archives

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional info: Alphabetised transcription and index in Hertfordshire County Records: Calendar to the Sessions Books, Sessions Minute Books and Other Sessions Records with Appendices 1700 to 1752, Volume VII, ed. W. Le Hardy (Hertford, 1935), pp. 477-563.

Huntingdonshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 No returns identified – information Alexa Cox (Mrs), Archivist, Huntingdonshire Archives and Local Studies

Kent

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Kent County

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Kent History and Library Centre

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: CKSQ/RRo/6/8

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: None presently available

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Permalink for this paragraph 0 Queensborough Borough

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Kent History and Library Centre

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: CKS-Qbo

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: None presently available

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Borough of Lydd

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: Ly 6/4/6/6

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: 84 names

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Permalink for this paragraph 0 Faversham Borough

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: CKS-FA/JQo6

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: Sessions of 10 and 24 December 1723 contain c.150 signatures

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Ms C M Russell, Collections Development Officer, Libraries, Registration and Archives; Kent online catalogue (www.kentarchives.org.uk)

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Lancashire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Lancashire Record Office, Preston

Permalink for this paragraph 0 References: QSJ 6/10; QSJ 6/11

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: 2 bound volumes with the oaths written out at the
beginning:  they relate to the oath of allegiance, abjuration of the
Pope and Pretenders, and to support the Act of Settlement.  The
thousands of names included are organised, it seems, geographically,
presumably as the Sessions moved around the towns of Lancashire where
they were held.  They include males and females, literate and
illiterate. The smaller volume (QSJ 6/10) 25 Jul – 12 Nov 1723 appears to have around 25 names per page, and contains at least 240 pages c. 6000 names.
The larger volume (QSJ 6/11:  30 x 400pp) 11 Nov – 23 Dec 1723 c12000
names

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Neil Sayer, Archive Access Manager

Leicestershire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 No county or borough rolls but some subscription certificates.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional information: Some subscription certificates available – DG6/C/131 certificate of the oath of subscription of William Grubb of Kilby, a papist, at Quarter Sessions, Leicester, 23 Dec. 1723.
DE6584  certificate of Richard Children at Tunbridge Wells, Kent, 1723.
DE107/32 Certificate of Arthur Woolley of Throgmorton Street, London, 10 Sep 1723.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Keith Ovenden, Archivist, Record Office for Leicestershire, Leicester & Rutland

Lincolnshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Parts of Lindsey

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: ‘LQS/D/Oaths and Declarations/Oaths of Allegiance, 1703-1744′

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical Description: Within this bundle the items relating to the oath of 1723 are two very large single sheets of parchment (one of which is damaged).
Lincolnshire, Parts of Kesteven Quarter Sessions

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: ‘KQS/D/Oaths/Registers of oaths of allegiance and against transubstantiation, 1689-1830′
Physical description: Within this bundle the items relating to the oath of 1723 are sixteen sheets of parchment which are fastened together at the top to form one roll (some damage).

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: James Stevenson, Collections Access Officers, Lincolnshire Archives

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London

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: London Metropolitan Archives

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: CLA/047/LR/02/04/028

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: C. 6500 names of individuals who took the loyalty oaths at the Guildhall between Aug and Dec 1723. The same document contains about 200 Quaker affirmations as well. A list of Catholics registering their estates is at CLA/047/LR/02/04/059.  Both documents include significant details of subscribers – occupations, parish, precinct and even road address.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: S. Dibbs, ‘Catholics & Non-Jurors in the 1723 Loyalty Oath Rolls of the City of London’, Catholic Ancestor, Journal of the Catholic Family History Society, 12, no. 2 (2008), pp.84-92. I am grateful to Simon Dixon for bringing this article to my attention.

Middlesex

Permalink for this paragraph 1 See London/LMA holdings

Monmouthshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 No returns – information from Mrs Neta P Whitehead, Records, Information and Data Manager,

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Gwent Archives

Norfolk

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Norwich

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Norfolk Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: NCR Case 13/d4

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: c. 1600 names . c. 300 identifiable as women. Subscriptions taken 24 July 1723 to 16 Dec 1723. Roll is not in strict chronological order. Only place of subscription identified Norwich Guildhall. Single roll made up of three membranes with signatures and marks on both sides.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Edward Vallance

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional info: For a transcription of the preamble to this document see the archived Virtual Norfolk Website

Permalink for this paragraph 0  

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Norwich Cathedral Precinct

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Norfolk Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: DCN 82/13

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: 152 signatures, 75 women can be identified. Single roll made up of three membranes. Sessions taken 7th October 1723

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Edward Vallance

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional info: As Norwich Cathedral had its own probate court, it is possible to compare some of these signatories to information in Norwich Cathedral wills. See for some examples NRO PRDC 1/2/8 and NRO Microfilm MF 477.

Permalink for this paragraph 0  

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Great Yarmouth

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: Y/S/7/1

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: Roll of three membranes containing oaths of supremacy and abjuration of the House of Stuart under Statute of 1 Geo. I. Many signatures  12 Aug. – 24 Dec. 1723

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Access to archives

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional information: P. Gauci, Politics and Society in Great Yarmouth 1660-1722 (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1996), p. 252n. states that the Yarmouth roll contains 1,234 subscriptions taken between 19 Sept and 24 December 1723 but that ‘unlike the Association of 1696, over a quarter of the subscribers were women’. A loyal address accompanying the roll can be found at Y/C19/11.

Northamptonshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Northamptonshire Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: Miscellaneous Quarter Sessions Records Box 401 (quarter sessions records not fully catalogued so lack individual document references)

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: Two rolls, both are several metres in length and clearly contain hundreds of names, including those of a significant number of women.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Scott Pettitt, Customer Access Supervisor

Northumberland

Permalink for this paragraph 0 No county records – information, Paul R Ternent, Senior Archives Assistant

Permalink for this paragraph 0  

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Newcastle

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Tyne and Wear Archives & Museums

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: QS NC/1/4

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: contains a reference to making the act known and provides
for adjourned sessions on 6th and 20th November, 4th and 18th December
1723 for those wishing to take the oath, but there is no actual record
of the sessions

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Rachel Gill, Archives Enquiry Team

Permalink for this paragraph 0  

Nottinghamshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Nottinghamshire Archives

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: C/QS/O/18-20

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: C/QS/O/18: July – October 1723.  The width of the roll at its top edge is 38.2cm approx and is 895cm approx in length, c. 1442 names, of which c.229 are women. One membrane includes place of residence; C/QS/O/19: August 1723.  The width of this roll as its top edge is 37.5cm approx and its length is 610cm approx. c. 967 names, approx. 107 women.  This roll is very fragile, and the bottom membrane has become detached from the remainder.  In addition there are some lacunae along the edge of the roll and so some names are partial or missing; C/QS/O/20: October – December 1723.  The roll measures 39cm approx in width along its top edge, and 583cm approx in length. Approx 852 names with approx. 402 of these women.  Again this roll is fragile and there are some lacunae on the edge of the roll, although less than in C/QS/O/19, above. Total from all three rolls: 3261 names of which approx. 738 are women.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Peter Lester, Archivist, Nottinghamshire County Council and Peter Hammond, Research Assistance, Nottinghamshire County Council.

Oxfordshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 No returns – information, Hannah Jones, Archivist

Shropshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Bridgnorth Borough

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Shropshire archives

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference. BB/F/2/3/13/43

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: 1 large parchment sheet approx. 80 cm x 33 cm

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Flat, folded

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Dates 8 Aug,  2 Sept, 16 Sept,  30 Sept,  4 Oct,   28 Oct, 31 Oct,   18 Nov, 25 Nov,  20 December 1723

Permalink for this paragraph 0  

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Ludlow Borough

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Shropshire archives

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference. LB11/4/150 {Quarter Session Files}

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: One very large parchment sheet in poor condition. 84cm x 75 cm

Permalink for this paragraph 0 6 Oct, 9 Oct, 19 Oct,22 Oct, 29 Oct, 12 Nov 1723

Permalink for this paragraph 0  

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Shrewsbury Borough

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Shropshire archives

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference 3365/2468

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: Seven parchment sheets very tightly rolled 70cm x 35 cm

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Sheet 1

Permalink for this paragraph 0 11 Oct 1723

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Sheet 2

Permalink for this paragraph 0 10 July 1723, 20 Aug, 16 Sept, 28 Sept, 1 Oct, 11 Oct, 15 Oct, 22 Oct

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Sheet 3

Permalink for this paragraph 0 22 Oct, 29 Oct, 5 Nov, 11 Nov, 12 Nov, 19 Nov.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Sheet 4

Permalink for this paragraph 0 5 Dec, 10 Dec

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Sheet 5

Permalink for this paragraph 0 17 Dec,

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Sheet 6

Permalink for this paragraph 0 19 Dec, 23 Dec. 24 Dec

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Sheet 7

Permalink for this paragraph 0 24 Dec, 25 Dec 1723

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source:  Alison Healey, Researcher, Shropshire Archives Team

Somerset

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Somerset Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: Q/RROA/3/23/19-20; Q/RROA/3/24/5-6

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: Returns cover July-December 1723. No women subscribers recorded. These are single sheets and the largest Q/RROA/3/24/5 has only 18 signatures on it. As in Devon, clerks made two versions of the rolls, one with original signatures and marks and another fair copy.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Jane de Gruchy, Archivist, Somerset Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional info: Somerset also holds two individual oath certificates, reference DD/MT/24/19/2, for Mary and Joan Southwood of Churchstanton, under Act of Succession, 1723.

Staffordshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Staffordshire Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: Q/RRo/2/1-5; Q/SPr/1/33,35

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description:

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Q/RRo/2/1 – Oaths of allegiance taken at Burton on Trent, Michaelmas session 1723
Q/RRo/2/2 – Oaths of allegiance taken at Wolverhampton, Michaelmas session 1723
Q/RRo/2/3 – Oaths of allegiance taken at Leek, Michaelmas session 1723
Q/RRo/2/4 – Oaths of allegiance taken at Eccleshall, Michaelmas session 1723
Q/RRo/2/5 – Oaths of allegiance taken at Stafford, Michaelmas session 1723
Q/SPr/1/33 – Recognisances, 1721, includes oaths of allegiance: Michaelmas 1723
Q/SPr/1/35 – Recognisances, includes lists of persons who took the Oaths of Allegiance and Repudiation of the Old Pretender at Alrewas, Michaelmas 1723
Q/SPr/1/36 – Recognisances, includes oaths taken at Uttoxeter, Michaelmas 1723
Q/SR/520 – Sessions roll, 1725, includes Oaths of Allegiance at Shenstone, September 1723

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Rebecca Jackson, Duty Archivist, Staffordshire Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional information: Staffordshire Record Office also holds D(W)1778/I/ii/580A/1-5  – Earl of Aylesford to Lord Dartmouth. Re. Parliament affairs and family business, oath of allegiance and the effects it is likely to have, 4 letters, 7 Mch.1722/3-28 Nov. [1723]; D641/4/J/20/5 – Oath of allegiance of Susanna Bacon, 1723 (NB this is Suffolk family, not Staffordshire)

Permalink for this paragraph 0  

Suffolk

Permalink for this paragraph 0 No significant returns – information Dr Helen Band, Searchroom Assistant, Suffolk Record Office and Louise Kennedy, Archivist, Libraries, Archives & Information, Adult & Community Services, Ipswich Record Office

Surrey

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Surrey History Centre

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: QS2/5/1723

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: The oaths are written on a large folio that has been attached to the sessions bundle and are followed by a list of names of both genders. In Epiphany and Easter there are 25 names and 6 names respectively but in Midsummer and Michaelmas over 100 names have been listed on each folio. Totals for Midsummer and Michaelmas = c. 258 with c. 58 women.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Laura Walker, Surrey History Centre. Transcription of the roll produced by Jane Lewis, Team Leader, Heritage Public Services

Sussex

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: East Sussex Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference QDR/4/EW5

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: Single sheet subscriptions to oaths to George I taken at Petworth, 7th October 1723. C. 150 signatures or marks (c.20 women), some illegible.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Edward Vallance

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional info: The Winchelsea Borough Hundred Book (WINCH MS 60) contains records of a number of men and women subscribing the oaths Nov/Dec 1723. The wives of freeholders, jurors and constables are recorded as swearing, sometimes with their husbands. See f. 219-220 in this volume.

Warwickshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 No records – Malcolm Boyns, Archivist

Westmoreland

Permalink for this paragraph 0 See under Cumbria

Wiltshire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Wiltshire and Swindon Archives

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: (WSA) A1/240

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: c10,000 signatures taken at various places in the county of those swearing loyalty to George 1. Separate rolls for Quakers making affirmations. No place of abode given in these rolls.
The roll, for the Michaelmas Sessions, also includes oaths sworn and subscribed or marked in the same year. (3 bundles).

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Robert Jago, Archivist.

Worcestershire

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: Worcestershire Record Office

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: 1/1/110/265/1-29

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: 29 separate membranes in one roll, stitched at the top making them hard to read in places. Authorised 16 July 1723. C. 2800 names and marks, c. 550 women. Place of subscription given: ‘Upton’, ‘at the Talbott in Sidbury’, ‘Tenbury Shelsl[e]y’ ‘Shelsl[e]y Walsh’, ‘Dudley’, ‘Denton’, ‘Pershore’. Last subscription listed, Kidderminster 26th Sept 1723. Subscribers’ place of residence sometimes identified.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Edward Vallance

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional info: Subscriptions taken at Michaelmas sessions are listed under 1/1/110/267/1-37 – Access to archives.

York

Permalink for this paragraph 0 York City

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: York City Archives

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: Quarter Sessions Minute Book YCA F12/f. 140-149

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: C. 1600 subscribers, perhaps 50% women. Subscriptions taken 5th Sept-24th Dec 1723. Marital/social status and occupation of subscribers listed.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Additional information: A transcription and index of the York City return has been made by Brian Jones and the archive holds a copy of this transcription. Jones estimates c. 1800 names. Further information, including others summoned to appear to take the oaths, can be found in Quarter Sessions Minute Book YCA F13

Permalink for this paragraph 0  

Permalink for this paragraph 0 East Riding

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: East Riding archives and local studies service

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: QDR/1/6-12

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: QDR/1/6 Oath Roll, 23 Apr-20 Dec 1723,

Permalink for this paragraph 0 sessions held at Beverley, Hunmanby, York Castle and Skipwith, 80 names;

Permalink for this paragraph 0 QDR/1/7  Oath Roll, 13 Aug-16 Nov 1723, sessions held at Beverley, Watton Abbey, Bridlington and Boynton, single parchment membrane 970mm x 430mm, 50 names;

Permalink for this paragraph 0 QDR/1/8  Oath Roll, 13-14 Sep 1723, sessions held at Escrick and Howden, single parchment membrane 870mm x 230mm, 150 names; QDR/1/9  Oath Roll, 14-28 Sep 1723, sessions held at: Howden, Hedon, Hornsea and York Castle, single parchment membrane 660mm x 310mm, 20 names; QDR/1/10  Oath Roll 14 Sep 1723, sessions held at Howden, single parchment membrane  970mm x 300mm, 200 names; QDR/1/11  Oath Roll 16 Sep 1723, sessions held at Pocklington, single parchment membrane 990mm x 280mm, 280 names; QDR/1/12 Oath Roll 16 Sep 1723, sessions held at Pocklington, single parchment membrane 1050mm x 290mm, 280 names.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Ian Mason, Archives Manager, East Riding

Other returns

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Repository: The National Archives, Kew

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Reference: E 169/4:

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Physical description: A clean roll of thin parchment, easy to handle. Its preamble is an oath of allegiance to King George; abjuration of the papal doctrine that excommunicated princes should be deposed; and an acknowledgment that King George is lawful king and that ‘James III’ has no rights thereto.  Dated Michaelmas Term 1723, 10 Geo 1.  It has six columns of signatures, many of them Londoners.  Some give their locations, eg ‘Covent Garden’, ‘without Aldgate’, ‘Chancery Lane’; but also ‘of Bristol’, ‘of Cobham, Surry’, ‘Dedington, Oxon’, ‘Citty of Bath’, ‘Epsom’, etc.  The signatories are headed 23 Oct (in Latin), then 26 Oct.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 Source: Pete Seaman, following up references provided by Simon Dixon.

Permalink for this paragraph 0  

Permalink for this paragraph 0  



Permalink for this paragraph 0 [1] Finding lists exist for both the Protestation and the 1696 Association: Jeremy Gibson, The Hearth Tax and other later Stuart tax lists and the Association oath rolls (FFHS, 1996); Jeremy Gibson and Alan Dell,  The Protestation Returns and Other Contemporary Listings (FFHS, 1995).

Permalink for this paragraph 0 [2] See here the information on the Devon oath rolls website: http://www.foda.org.uk/oaths/intro/introduction16.htm (accessed 28 June 2013)

Permalink for this paragraph 0 [3] For the Non-jurors see J. C. Findon, ‘The Non Jurors and the Church of England c. 1689-1716’, (unpublished Oxford University DPhil thesis, 1979)

Permalink for this paragraph 0 [4] For the Elizabethan bond see Patrick Collinson, ‘The Monarchical Republic of Elizabeth’;Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, 69 (1987), 394-424; David Cressy, ‘Binding the Nation: The Bonds of Association 1584 and 1696’ in Tudor Rule and Revolution: Essays for G. R. Elton from his American friends, ed. D. J. Guth and J. W. McKenna (Cambridge, 1982), pp. 217-34

Permalink for this paragraph 0 [5] For these figures, taken from contemporary press reports see D. Cressy, Literacy and the Social Order (Cambridge, 1980), ch.4; for the population of Suffolk see J. Patten, ‘Population Distribution in Norfolk and Suffolk during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries’, Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 65 (1975), pp. 45-65; for a recent discussion of the Association see Steve Pincus, 1688: The First Modern Revolution (Yale, 2009), pp. 437-74.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 [6] On the Atterbury plot see E. Cruickshanks and H. Erskine-Hill, The Atterbury Plot (Palgrave, 2004)

Permalink for this paragraph 0 [7] P. Clark, British Clubs and Societies 1580-1800 (Oxford, 2000).

Permalink for this paragraph 0 [8] For some contemporary reflections on women’s involvement in politics at this time, see Secret Comment: The Diaries of Gertrude Savile, 1721-1757 (Kingsbridge History Society, 1997) and see below entries for Norwich and Sussex for families swearing together.

Permalink for this paragraph 0 [9] http://www.foda.org.uk/oaths/intro/introduction5.htm

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